the local distributor for torus/bryston, av designs, has kindly forwarded bryston's response on the issue of UK-Vs-US receptacle on the torus PLC.

Some extracts from the attached circular:-

“They [the NEMA 5-15 USA style receptacles] are rated for 120 volts 15 amps and should NEVER be used with 240 Volt gear.”

“Torus has spent many thousands of dollars making sure our products get all the essential Certifications and Safety documentation necessary.”

“So please be very cautious when using 120 Volt rated plugs and power cables with 240 Volt equipment. In fact don’t do it!”

what bryston is implying is: most US-manufactured PLCs for the malaysian market do not have CE certification for safety (in using the US-receptacle for 240V) so you have to use it at your own risk!

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14 comments:

km ng said...

M,

Other than US (and Japanese, my addition) made PLCs, I would think the warning also applies to US PLUGS AND POWER CABLES (my emphasis) designed and made for the 100-120V power grid but used in our 240V power grid.

Any chances of causing electric shock, fire hazard or damage to equipment, if used?

Can any local electrical engineer comment on this warning?

KGOH said...

HEY,let us talk about the sound..the main problem with the British type PC is that it is fused;hence I would always prefer the us type PC

f8. said...

Would be good to see an independent party making these statements since Torus Power is essentially a joint venture between Bryston and Plitron, thus the endorsement of Torus by Bryston.

km ng said...

On browsing the WWW, I noted there are NEMA 6-15 plugs and sockets, rated for 250V applications.

They look similar to the NEMA 5-15, except the blades are horizontal whereas the 5-15 are vertical.

Can someone please check with Torus on whether the 6-15 sockets and plugs can here used safely here?

Anonymous said...

Actually certification of hifi equipment for local use is a blackhole that very few local importers want to even talk about.
Please tell me which brand of imported hifi electronics is vetted by SIRIM for use in your local homes... I can tell you none at all ;)
So will that stop you with playing hifi? Doubt so, the risk of having a fire caused by hifi equipment burning out is probably much lesser than one getting mugged by robbers on the street these days

Anonymous said...

If you check the specs, yes, the American plugs and sockets are specified for 125V max. So, technically, it would make sense.

However, on the other side, has anyone suffered a hi-fi blow-up here using American plugs? PS Audio has sold numerous US-spec'd power outlets here, never heard anything negative so far.

Perhaps we should ask electronics experts to explain why outlets and plugs have specific voltage and amphere ratings? After all, it's just electricity running through metal and wire, so why is there a specified limitation? I'm a novice, so would love to know.

Annoyedmouse

maggielurva 愛美姬 said...

anonymous at 11:35,
yes, you are darn funny! i fully agree with your remarks.

Anonymous said...

hmm my shunyata hydra 4 that i bought new and came in a factory-sealed box had a sticker saying '250 volts max' on it. the outlets have the usual vertical pins for live and neutral. we need an engineering bod to enlighten us here...

Panzer said...

Hi all!

I am not the most qualified person, but spoke to an unqualified electrical engineer about our hifi vs safety dilema and got a pretty sobering, if practical answer from that fella.

His opinion is that one must know how much current, i.e. ampere, each pc of equipment is drawing when switched on. Obviously most source or pre amps are O.K. as they each only draw 3 amps max(my previous tube based Sonic Frontiers Line 2 used to do that) during operations. All NEMA 5-15 plug and recepticles are rated for 10 amps. So there's much head room still.

The main concern will be power amps, you will need to measure the current draw of your power amps to be sure. Case in point, each of my Pass Alephs draw a constant 2.6-2.8 amps during operations, so it's still very much below the 10 amp spec rated for most NEMA 5-15 plugs and receptacles.

He also point out the the NEMA 5-15 plugs are rated 10amps at 125V, meaning in our 240V conditions, the same NEMA 5-15 plug should only be about 5amps or so. Point is to be very carefull. That's all. BTW only use the real stuff like Hubbell, Wattgate, Furutech or Oyaide, as the fake plugs don't actually quite meet the rated 10amps! Just to feel safe and sound!

Also of note to certification, Torus is trully an hospital grade product(used to power MRI scanners I was told), hence the CE Mark requirement. Though I know other maunfacturers like Pure Power and Shunyata aren't CE certified, their use of the NEMA 5-16, which is the 250V, 15amps rated recepticles in a way do make them safe. The worry is however, at the male plug side of the high end power cords, normally terminated with NEMA 5-15 plugs, so even if the PLC does meet our 240V, 13amp requirement stds, it's the cable side which is not up to it.

So going back to the above, most source and pre amps are fine. Power amps are the ones that us audiophiles need to excersice caution, should you choose to use the NEMA 5-15 equipped power cords!

I hope I've been reasonably clear.

Panzer said...

Also folks,

I cannot be held responsible for my above statements posted. They are merely guidelines, based on the view of an experienced electrical industrial engineer and cannot be taken as absolute electrical fact.

Like I said, I am unqualified, neither is he licensed, but he has 20 years experience or so in the electrical industrial sector.

GCK said...

Hi Panzer, I concur with your friend. If the plug is rated at 120V 15A , then at 240V it should be take 7.5A max only. It is the power it can carry without overheating or melting. It boils down to the thickness and purity of the conductor.
I had a bad experience with my water heater switch. The condo developer used the MIC switch and after 2 years, the wire insulation melted and caused the +ve and -ve to short and trip the ELCB.
The wire used was not a problem but the switch was the culprit causing the wire to heat up and melt the insulation. I have since changed to Clipsal made in Malaysia.

GCK said...

Hi Panzer, I concur with your friend. If the plug is rated at 120V 15A , then at 240V it should be take 7.5A max only. It is the power it can carry without overheating or melting. It boils down to the thickness and purity of the conductor.
I had a bad experience with my water heater switch. The condo developer used the MIC switch and after 2 years, the wire insulation melted and caused the +ve and -ve to short and trip the ELCB.
The wire used was not a problem but the switch was the culprit causing the wire to heat up and melt the insulation. I have since changed to Clipsal made in Malaysia.

Ken said...

Hi GCK,
Just a few questions.

1. I was wondering if the Clipsal is better than PDI?

2. Would be grateful if you could tell me the price of a Clipsal 13amp plug point?

3. What about those MK Plug point and also IsoClean plug point?

Thanks

GCK said...

Hi Ken, I used Oyaide for my hifi system plug point outlet (US plug). Sorry, no idea about the British plug stuff for 13A plug point.
I just bought Clipsal in a hurry to settle the trip problem at my rented out condo from one of the electrical shop in Sec21. Clipsal water heater switch can take 20A 240V. It costs RM23.